About Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge:

The Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge is located in the northwest region of Kaua'i. The refuge was established in 1985 with the goal of preserving seabird nesting colonies in the area. By 1988, it had expanded to also include Mokolea Point and Crater Hill. The Kilauea Point Lighthouse, which was built in 1913, is also located within the refuge.

Visitors to the refuge can see some of Hawaii's largest nesting seabird populations as well as Hawaiian monk seals, spinner dolphins, and Hawaii's state bird, the nene. Many species of migratory birds visit the refuge as they travel, including laysan albatross, tropicbirds, and wedge-tailed shearwaters. The refuge is also home to a wide variety of native Hawaiian plants and trees.

A short walk from the refuge's entrance is Kilauea Point, where visitors can view the Pacific Ocean and spot the refuge's seabirds. The refuge is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays through Saturdays. It takes at least 30 minutes to see the main attractions at the refuge, but many people spend more time exploring the area.

 

4280-4286 Kilauea Road

Kilauea, HI, 96754

Directions